Archive | Around the Polisci Blogosphere

Political Scientists Today

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

We thank Bennett Butler for all his help with this feature over the summer, and wish him well as his semester begins at Princeton.

Continue Reading

Around the PoliSci Blogosphere

Thanks, as always, to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling this list.

Continue Reading

Around the PoliSci Blogosphere

Thanks, as always, to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling this list.

Continue Reading

Around the PoliSci Blogosphere

Thanks, as always, to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling this list.

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

Thanks, as always, to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling this list.

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

  • Marc Lynch: Why Washington should stay far away from Egypt.
  • Richard Ned Lebow: “Most wars are not fought for reasons of security or material interests, but instead reflect a nation’s ‘spirit.’”

Thanks, as always, to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling this list.

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

Thanks again to Bennett Butler for his help in compiling these.

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

Here’s our second installment (last week’s was here).  Once again we appreciate the help of Bennett Butler.

  • Karen Shanton: Possible obstacles to voter identification laws in the states.

  • Anthony Bubalo: Egypt’s “coup de-fault.”

  • Dan Drezner: What Edward Snowden tells us about international relations.

  • Jay Ulfelder: The causes of mass protest.

  • John Patty: “Believe Me When I Say That I Want To Believe That I Can’t Believe In You.”

Continue Reading

Around the Polisci Blogosphere

This is the inaugural post in what we hope will be a weekly feature, highlighting interesting posts from blogs written by political scientists or by people in sister disciplines that bear directly on topical political issues.   The posts will therefore be a bit more focused than the polyglot assortment in our typical “potpourri.”  Assisting us with this feature is Bennett Butler, a Princeton University undergraduate in the Department of Politics.  We’re glad to have his help.

  • Stephen Walt: Will the internet make democracies more like dictatorships, and vice versa?

  • Jay Ulfelder: Why Egyptian politics is like a truel.  (That’s not a typo.)

  • Lionel Beehner: Do presidential administrations really have “bandwidth”?

  • Richard Pildes: The secret to reforming the VRA

  • Eric Ostermeier: Everything you’d ever want to know about Senate special elections

 

Continue Reading